Exchanging Experiences, Expanding Opportunities

Implementation

Printer-friendly version

PROSPERA Social Inclusion Program

Image:
PROSPERA Social Inclusion Program
Preferred Methods of Exchange:
English

The purpose of PROSPERA is the articulation and coordination of the institutional offer of social oriented programs and actions, including those related to production development, income generation, economic, financial and labor inclusion, education, food and health, aimed at the population in extreme poverty, under responsibilities schemes that enable families to improve their living conditions and ensure the enjoyment of their social rights and access to social development and equality.

Prospera Logo

Member country:
Project duration:
January, 2014
Project status:
Implementing Institution:

Financial Empowerment Centers

Image:
Financial Empowerment Centers
Target population:
Additional Involvement:

The Financial Empowerment Centers were initially launched in New York City by a mayoral agency called NYC Department of Consumer Affairs/Office of Financial Empowerment (OFE). Nonprofit grantees were selected by OFE to provide client services (1 on 1 financial counseling). Often different nonprofit organizations physically hosted the services within their organizations. Social service providers from other NYC mayoral agencies saw value in the financial counseling services and integrated such services into the own programs to best serve their clients. In some instances, they required their clients to go to Financial Empowerment Centers. Partner agencies include: Department of Homeless Services (serving people in the shelter system), Human Resources Administration (providing “one‐shot” emergency grants, signing people up for government benefits), Housing Authority (serving those in the public housing to get people new/better jobs), and Parks Department (serving transitional employment program participants).

Funding was initially provided by private foundations, mostly from financial institutions, who made donations to the City’s nonprofit 501(c)3 entity for tax purposes. The City’s nonprofit then paid the non‐ private contractors for services provided.

Eventually, NYC government used tax‐levy dollars to fund the program and the City released a Request for Proposals to officially select contractors for this program.

The replication projects are being funded similarly with the funding all coming from a single private family foundation.

English

The Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund’s definition of financial counseling is to convey personalized— not general educational—information to directly and measurably improve a client’s unique financial situation. The model relies on a comprehensive financial health assessment that financial counselors complete with each client in order to understand their unique needs and current financial condition. This allows counselors to work together with clients to develop a customized service plan to help clients achieve milestones along their path to achieving their financial goals and, ultimately, their goals for their individual or family stability.

Outlining a clear path and timeline to reaching personal goals encourages clients to return and to see the progress they are making over time toward their goals. Expectations for client service levels and outcomes (to reduce debt, improve credit, increase savings, open safe and affordable bank accounts) also provide consistent standards and guidance for financial counselors and for integration partners as well as clients.

Achievements:
  1. Integrated: Deep partnerships with many NYC government agencies (homeless services, human resources administration, children’s services, housing authority, etc.) that recommend or even require their participants to receive financial counseling
  2. Demonstrated success: Success of New York City model, which relied on private funding in the first three years, demonstrated success so that in 2010, the program was included (using taxpayer levy dollars) into the general New York City budget. Some outcomes include $2.2 million of savings and $12.4 million of debt reduced to date.
  3. Replicable: Successful replication of model to five additional cities (launched in March 2013), which have all built the program from scratch based on integrated partnerships.
Member country:
Project duration:
November, 2007
Implementing Institution:

Targeted Conditional Cash Transfer Programme

Image:
Targeted Conditional Cash Transfer Programme
Target population:
Additional Involvement:

‘Puente in the Caribbean’ program was launched in 2007.This regional program greatly assisted in the early stages of conceptualization and design. The major organizations involved were the Organization of American States (OAS) through the Canadian Agency for International Development (CIDA), El Fondo de Solidario e Inversión Social (FOSIS) of the Government of Chile and University of the West Indies

  • The Programme’s food support was implemented via a Debit Card. Persons were not given cash but rather they were able to purchase foodstuff. The First Citizens’ Bank of Trinidad was the chosen provider. They manage the cash transaction which includes the debiting of the various accounts and payment to merchants. They provide the Ministry with a comprehensive breakdown of all card transaction.
  • The Supermarket Association in general as well as other supermarkets were key stakeholders. They facilitate the transfer of a pre‐approved list of food items which are paid for with the debit card.
  • The initiative was not intended to create any new intervention so the Ministry of the People entered into arrangement with other Ministries/Agencies and private sector entities to operationalize the conditional component. This included training, retraining, upgrading of skills and employment. Additionally, these entities, were involved in activities to support of the mandatory components of the programme which includes family planning, household budgeting and life skills.
English

To Reduce the Incidence of Poverty in Society

Achievements:
  • Poverty reports suggested that level of indigence in the country was 1.2% (Just over 15,000 persons). At the end of Fiscal 2013 there were 42,202 persons on the programme. We feel that indigence no longer exist in Trinidad and Tobago. (To be determined via a current study)
  • Successfully worked with business partners to train or through direct employment to assist 8698 to successfully graduated from the programme by increasing the household income earning capacity. Out of this 208 persons became entrepreneurs.
  • The implementation of an emergency food support mechanism where persons are issued with a card for immediate use. Since its introduction over 25, 702 cards were issued.
Member country:
Project duration:
July, 2006
Project status:

Kraka Yu Srefi

Image:
Kraka Yu Srefi
Additional Involvement:

For the design of the program a steering and working group has been installed within the ministry of Social Affairs & Public Housing. In addition, members of the National Assembly have been involved. For the implementation of the program, the following ministries have been approached: Ministry of Education, Ministry of Justice & Police, Ministry of Labour, Technological development & Environment, Ministry of Regional Development, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Sport & Youth. We have technical assistance of UNICEF & UNDP.

English

The overall objective of the experience is to empower people. Other objectives:

  • Digital registration systems & data processing
  • A monitoring & evaluation system for intangible care & guidance
  • Poverty measure for Suriname
Achievements:
  1. Digital registration systems & data processing
  2. A monitoring and evaluation system for the intangible care & guidance
  3. How to measure poverty in Suriname
Member country:
Project duration:
May, 2013 to May, 2014
Project status:

M.E.N.D. Families in St. Kitts and Nevis Programme

Image:
M.E.N.D. Families in St. Kitts and Nevis Programme
Target population:
Additional Involvement:

The Ministry of Community Development, Culture and Gender Affairs (MOCDCGA) is the focal point for poverty reduction measures implemented by the Government of St. Kitts and Nevis. Its mission statement is to promote a high quality human services programme designed to facilitate and encourage self-reliance, full participation in national development, child rights, family wellness, the enrichment and enjoyment of senior citizens and gender mainstreaming.

The Inter-Ministerial Committee for Social Protection is a Federal Cabinet established body made up of key stakeholder Ministries and Departments that are critical to the full implementation and sustainability of the actions outlined in the National Social Protection Strategy. Specifically, their function is to monitor and evaluate the implementation of the Plan of Action and Monitoring and Evaluation Framework of the National Social Protection Strategy.

The National Implementation Team for the M.E.N.D. Families SKN Programme is charged with management and monitoring and evaluation of the Programme for three (3) years, 2013 – 2016. The duties of the Team are as follows:

  • The Team will offer input and guidance towards the implementation of the M.E.N.D. Families SKN Programme.
  • The Team shall act as the middle management and implementation committee for the M.E.N.D. Families SKN Programme.

The Department of Social Services and Community Development under the purview of the Ministry of Community Development, Culture and Gender Affairs is the implementing and coordinating agency for the strategies and actions of the National Social Protection Strategy and its Plan of Action.

As such, the Department will be the focal point for the implementation of the M.E.N.D. Families SKN Programme. This includes the operationalization of all of the procedures and processes involved in the both the piloting and scale up process.

In March of 2012, the Federal Government approved the National Social Protection Strategy. This document along with the National Poverty Reduction Strategy stands as the guiding documents for poverty reduction in the Federation.

One of the actions of the National Social Protection Strategy is the review of the Social Development Assistance Act, the guiding legislative framework for social safety net programs in the Federation.

Technical Assistance for the creation and implementation of the M.E.N.D. Families SKN Programme was provided by the Organization of American States, UNICEF, UN Women, World Bank, the Government of Jamaica through the PATH Program and the Government of St. Lucia, through the Social Investment Fund.

English

The goal of the M.E.N.D. Families SKN Programme is to eradicate indigence in the Federation of St. Kitts and Nevis

There are two (2) fundamental objectives of the Programme. These are:

  1. To build and strengthen the resilience of the indigent population thereby enabling them to benefit from investments in human capital development
  2. To provide streamlined, effective and efficient wrap-around services to the indigent population

The Programme intends to provide comprehensive support to the poorest and most vulnerable households aiming at strengthening and empowering them, thereby eliminating indigence and reducing poverty.

Achievements:

The pilot of the Programme is presently being implemented.

Member country:
Project duration:
September, 2013 to October, 2015
Project status:

Empowering the Poor

Image:
Empowering the Poor – An intervention for the Social Graduation from the Jamaican Conditional Cash Transfer Programme
Target population:
Additional Involvement:

Ministry of Labour and Social Security (MLSS)

  • Public Assistance Division

Ministry of Education (MOE)

Ministry of Youth and Culture (MOYC)

  • HEART Trust/NTA
  • National Youth Service
  • National Centre for Youth Development ‐ Jamaica Foundation for Lifelong Learning

MLSS Electronic Labour Exchange

Ministry of Industry, Technology, Energy and Commerce (MITEC)

  • Jamaica Business Development Corporation

MLSS

  • Rehabilitation Grant Programme

MOE / MLSS

  • Early Childhood Commission
  • National Council for Senior Citizens
  • Jamaica Council for Persons with Disabilities
Preferred Methods of Exchange:
English

Households attain the social protection floor and maintain income security for 12 months enabling them to be no longer eligible for PATH Cash Transfers.

Achievements:
  • Attainment of key variables in the social protection floor for targeted families
  • Complete pilot of a robust case management procedure and protocol for graduation
  • Complete pilot of a systematic welfare to work programme to strengthen labour activation and attachment among poor clients to enable them to seek and retain employment.
Member country:
Project duration:
March, 2013 to July, 2016
Project status:
Implementing Institution:

Women of Worth Microcredit Scheme

Image:
Women of Worth Microcredit Scheme
Target population:
Additional Involvement:

The stakeholders and institutions involved in the design and implementation process are: The Ministry of Labour, Human Services and Social Security and The Guyana Bank for Trade and Industry.

The Guyana Bank for Trade and Industry (GBTI) main responsibilities are as follows:

  • evaluating business plans and
  • financing micro loans

The Ministry of Labour, Human Services and Social Security for:

  • Initial screening of applicants
  • Training of beneficiaries/applicants
  • Assisting in the preparation of business plans
  • Monitoring of business ventures
  • Providing technical and other support to beneficiaries
  • Assisting in sourcing markets for beneficiaries
Preferred Methods of Exchange:
English

To improve the socioeconomic status of women in Guyana, promote their active participation and integration in national development and contribute towards poverty reduction; thereby stimulating micro and macro economic growth.

Achievements:
  • Provide access to financial resources and business development intervention to female single parents desirous of pursuing small business ventures.
  • A catalyst in creating an enabling environment (via Community Development Programmes) which allows people at community levels to take advantage of economic opportunities.
  • Increase women’s mobility, security, self esteem and participation in decision making process at a micro and macro levels.
Member country:
Project duration:
June, 2010 to June, 2015
Project status:
Implementing Institution:

SEED

Image:
Support for Education, Empowerment and Development (SEED) programme
Target population:
Additional Involvement:

SUPPORTING AGENCIES FOR SEED PROGRAMME IMPLEMENTATION

  • 2.1.1 RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE STEERING COMMITTEE: The Steering Committee is responsible for overall coordination of the SEED Programme and is chaired by the Ministry of Social Development and composed of representatives from MOSD, MOE, MOH, MOSD, MOF, PCU, Ministry of Legal Affairs and non‐governmental organizations.
  • 2.1.2 RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE TECHNICAL COMMITTEE: The Technical Committee is directly responsible for overseeing the design and implementation of the SEED Programme. It serves as the main mechanism through which the Ministries directly responsible for the Programme communicate and make decisions related to SEED implementation. The Committee members will ensure a steady reciprocal flow of information between the Committee and their respective Ministries, and facilitate consultations with Ministers and other key staff. The Technical Committee shall be composed of representatives from MOSD, MOE, MOH, and MOF.
  • 2.1.3 RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE MINISTRY OF FINANCE (MOF): The MOF has the responsibility of fulfilling the budgetary commitments of the GOG according to the requirements of the Programme.
    • 2.1.3.1 RESPONSIBILITIES OF DISTRICT REVENUE OFFICES (DROs): The DROs under the Ministry of Finance, are the primary location for payment of transfers to Beneficiary Households under the SEED Programme. Beneficiaries are paid via cash on a monthly basis from the current account designated at these locations for this purpose. DROs can serve as a point of contact for relaying information about the Programme. Staff at the DROs are responsible for liaising with the Accountant’s General Department, Ministry of Finance, regarding payments to Beneficiary Households and financial matters, including uncollected benefits.
    • 2.1.3.2 PROJECT COORDINATION UNIT (PCU): The PCU will provide fiduciary advice and guidance to all entities with responsibility for SEED Programme Implementation. The PCU will work closely with the MOSD and will provide guidance on compliance with fiduciary procedures and handle the procuring of goods and services for the MOSD.
    • 2.1.3.3 ACCOUNTANT GENERAL (AG): The AG’s office will liaise with the PCU to ensure timely and accurate financial reporting under the SEED Programme. The AG’s office provides final reconciliation of payments made under the arrangements for cash transfers. The AG will play a major role in liaising with financial staff in the MOSD to ensure that payment mechanisms employed by SEED are compatible with existing government accounting procedures.
  • 2.1.4 RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION (MOE): The MOE has the responsibility of ensuring that there are adequate places in pre‐school, primary, secondary and tertiary education to receive eligible Direct Beneficiaries from SEED Beneficiary Households as outlined in the SEED Programme Definitions. The MOE, as a key stakeholder of the Technical Committee, will also advise on on‐going trends in education outcomes, revisions to the Education Act, and potential revisions of education co‐responsibilities to build on the development of human capital.
    • Key staff in the MOE that will play supporting roles throughout the Programme include: School Attendance Officers: School Attendance Officers will be responsible for verifying compliance with education co‐responsibilities and liaising with SEED Officers every month to report school attendance of Direct Beneficiaries from SEED Beneficiary Households.
  • 2.1.5 RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE MINISTRY OF HEALTH (MOH): The MOH has the responsibility to ensure basic health services as defined by Grenada’s health protocols to eligible Direct Beneficiaries from SEED Beneficiary Households. The MOH, as a key stakeholder of the Technical Committee, will also advise on on‐going trends in health outcomes in the country and potential revisions of health co‐responsibilities to build on the development of human capital.
    • Key staff in the MOH that will play supporting roles throughout the Programme include: Community Health Nurses (CHNs): CHNs will validate the health care check‐ups and verify compliance of co‐responsibilities. Subsequently, they will liaise with the SEED Officers every month to report compliance of health co‐responsibilities of Direct Beneficiaries from SEED Beneficiary Households.
Preferred Methods of Exchange:
English

The general goal of the SEED programme is:

To reduce poverty and increase investment in human capital among the poor and vulnerable.

The specific objectives of SEED are to:

  1. Improve educational and health outcomes of the poor through co‐responsibilities that link positive behaviour changes to cash transfers.
  2. Improve coverage of Social Safety Net programmes.
  3. Strengthen the implementation capacity, efficiency and effectiveness of Grenada’s Social
  4. Safety Net programmes.
  5. Serve as a safety net by preventing families from falling further into poverty in the event of adverse shock.
Achievements:
  • Central Beneficiary Registry
  • Development of an Operational Manual. Its purpose is to provide an ordered set of instructions on the organisation, procedures, management and resources dedicated to the efficient and effective achievement of the aims of the Programme.
Member country:
Project duration:
January, 2011 to December, 2014
Project status:
Implementing Institution:

Cell-ED: Learning anywhere, anytime

Image:
Cell-ED: Learning anywhere, anytime
Target population:
Additional Involvement:
  • Gobee Group
  • Commonwealth of Learning
  • Tufts University
  • University of Ottawa
  • University of California, Los Angeles
  • Control Room
  • Comic Relief
English

Cell-ED is working to provide a second chance and new pathway to learning for the forgotten billion adults. We deliver mobile-based courses in literacy and basic skills to any phone at any time and place. Our objective is to enhance skills, increase knowledge, and increase the confidence of our learners to pursue further education opportunities. Our most recent cohort of Spanish language literacy learners had an average of a two-year age equivalency increase in their reading skills as measured by internationally recognized standardized tests.

Achievements:
  1. Learners have improved their skills with our program. A 2-year age equivalency increase when compared with the control group.
  2. Learners access the program at all hours of the day from 5am to 1am demonstrating the convenience and increased accessibility to education.
  3. We have an adherence rate of 80% compared with 20 – 50% in traditional classroom-based programs.
  4. We are creating a grassroots network of organizations to support our learners, as well as mechanisms for learners to support each other.
Project duration:
January, 2012
Project status:
Implementing Institution:

Capital Project

Image:
Capital Project
Target population:
Additional Involvement:
  • Proyecto Capital works with governments to design and improve public policies that promote financial inclusion and with financial institutions to design financial inclusion strategies for CCT recipients. Proyecto Capital also creates and shares knowledge to expand innovation linking financial inclusion and social protection.
  • Government: Proyecto Capital provides technical assistance in the design of CCT-linked financial inclusion programs, advises government bodies in the executants selection process and in follows up and monitors project implementation. The main roles of government bodies are to fund project activities and to provide technological and logistical support (mainly through its CCT program). Proyecto Capital also leads inter-institutional and inter-sectorial coordination activities (between planning, social inclusion and financial inclusion authorities).
  • Financial institutions: Proyecto Capital provides technical assistance in the design of suited financial products and channels, as well as in the development of adapted costumer services and the implementation of client protection principles.
English

Proyecto Capital describes a public intervention to facilitate and complement existing public government- to-person (G2P) transfer programs in general, and conditional cash transfer (CCT) programs in particular, and expand their scope and impact, as well as to encourage other stakeholders from the civil society, cooperation agencies and socially responsible businesses dedicated to poverty alleviation to get involved in this effort.

The general objectives are:

  • To promote the use of a better payment system for CCTs: the savings account
  • To provide a secure and convenient instrument to help families to save in the formal financial system.
  • To Facilitate access to and use of other financial services

Based on the encouraging results of financial inclusion programs, and particularly the mobilization of poor people’s savings, channels for a direct relationship between public sectors and recipients of social assistance, and virtuous processes of economic and social inclusion, Proyecto Capital works on a regional initiative to promote and implement mechanisms for financial inclusion as a complement to social policies implemented in Latin America and the Caribbean. This regional initiative assists with the design, implementation and evaluation of public policies that link social protection with mobilization of savings in low-income sectors.

Achievements:
  • Proyecto Capital succeed in interconnecting, combining and adjusting appropriate CCT programs with policies that encourage grassroots savings and inclusion of poor people in the financial system (opening and use of personal savings accounts), asset building, and access to knowledge essential for their businesses, facilitating their productive investment and reducing their vulnerability.
  • Proyecto Capital has cooperation agreements signed with ten countries, at least one financial institution in each country and two bank regulatory bodies.
  • Proyecto Capital also developed the capacity to influence and be involved in the design, implementation and evaluation of public policies related to financial inclusion and financial literacy for the BoP.
  • Finally, we have achieved a recognized regional expertise on understanding low-income populations financial behavior, content design and management of various channels for financial education and the design and development of suited savings products
Project duration:
January, 2008 to December, 2014
Implementing Institution:

Pages

Subscribe to Implementation